Ph.D. opportunity: USDA National Needs Fellow at the University of Florida Coffee agroecology under climate change

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Luke Flory  @lflory
RT @jpschimel:@DrBioGC And Anne Lamott wrote: Shitty First Drafts. All good writers write them. That is how they end up with good… https://t.co/juW0mfJqTS 
Luke Flory  @lflory
RT @hormiga:Don't be that senior author who allows their student to submit a manuscript which has obvious and fixable problems.… https://t.co/YO9bkfGCoQ 
Luke Flory  @lflory
RT @amyedunham:Recent and soon to be PHD's: Rice will be hiring a Huxley Fellow in Ecology and Evolutionary biology- 2-3yr fellow… https://t.co/fdlTe8Zgtf 
Luke Flory  @lflory
RT @EcoInvasions:Aptly named the Great Lakes. Here is a glimpse of the fury of Lake Michigan. Photo by @jeffreyewig https://t.co/yEz060sLBW 
Luke Flory  @lflory
RT @aimeeclassen:Shifting plant species composition in response to climate change stabilizes grassland primary production @UVM_RSENRhttps://t.co/tw0PaBJZ8p 
Luke Flory  @lflory
RT @JPWrightEcology:So glad to have this out - from the first discussion over beers with Jason Fridley over a decade ago to this produc… https://t.co/r4IZLE1zkJ 
Luke Flory  @lflory
Full funded PhD position still open on ecophys of coffee under climate change conditions @AgroecologyUF @UF_IFAS https://t.co/2syxlPrF2U 
Luke Flory  @lflory
RT @UF:Climbing a tree with PhD student Jesse Borden. He's studying community ecology and how ecosystems are responding t… https://t.co/d1mil1Eatt 

Welcome

Research in the Flory Lab at the University of Florida covers a wide variety of topics in plant and ecosystem ecology with a focus on non-native plant invasions and agroecology. Luke also oversees the UF/IFAS Assessment of Non-native Plants in Florida’s Natural Areas.

Some of the primary research questions we address include: “Which species are likely to become invasive and what habitats are susceptible to invasions?” “How do plant invasions impact communities and ecosystem processes?” and “How will plant invasion dynamics and interactions with native species change over the long-term?” For example, our recent NSF-funded project evaluated how the emergence and accumulation of pathogens might suppress an invasive grass (see Stricker et al., 2016, Ecology Letters) and where and how invasions might have the greatest ecosystem impacts.

Lab members have conducted research on various basic and applied plant and ecosystem ecology questions in diverse systems including climate change effects on coffee in Costa Rica, silvopastures in the Colombian Andes, managed grassland systems in south Florida, invaded forests in the Galapagos, pine forests in north Florida, and deciduous forests throughout the eastern US.

In general, our research group seeks to advance general ecological knowledge of plant communities and to answer applied questions that are relevant to natural areas management, restoration, and conservation.